Monthly Archive for: ‘August, 2010’

Local Offerings August 27th

Try a local apple!

Hunge Heirloom Apples – Raven Rock Farms
Field Peas – Cottle Organics
Purple Basil – Faucette
Yellow Squash – Heaven / Watauga
Zucchin Squash – Heaven / Watauga / Faucette
Slicing Tomatoes – Cane Valley
Cherry Tomatoes – New Market Farms
Fresh Goat Chevre – Celebrity Dairy
Hyrdoponic Lettuce – Flora Ridge Farm
Ground Beef – Tomahawk Farm
Flour, Grits, Cornmeal – Booneville Flour and Feed
Half and Half, Heavy Cream, Buttermilk – Homeland Creamery
Chicken – Hopkins Poultry

Meet Concho

Concho is the latest addition to the Guilford College Sustainability crew. You may have heard of chipper/ shredders, but Concho is very unique type of shredder/ grinder. More specifically, Concho is a Compost Shredder/ Grinder. Concho was built by Lindig Manufacturing Corp. in the 1970s. You can imagine our excitment when we stumbled across the craigslist add for the Concho Compost Shredder/Grinder as we’ve been looking for a way to further breakdown or sift our finished compost. We’ve also been on the hunt for a way to more finely shred some of the materials we put into our Eartub, particularly the corn based compostable cups, plates, and flatware that we use at our catered events. We think Concho can accomplish both of these objectives. We have found that the compostable disposables we use do break down in the Earthtub, but not very quickly. Also when a very large amount of these materials are put into the Earthtub, they tend to float on top, and the auger is not able to pull these materials into the active compost.

So after a bit of haggling with the craigslist seller over the phone, we drove out to Clemmons, NC to pick this thing up. We didn’t really know what to expect, as the seller didn’t really know much about it. He was in the construction business and they had found Concho abandoned on a job site. All he knew was the make and model and that it had a 7 HP Briggs and Statton motor. He had received one inquiry from Pennsylvania who was very interested, and told the seller that these pieces of machinery were pretty rare and that Lindig was not in business anymore. The interested buyer had decided that it was too far to drive though, and he hadn’t had another offer until we came along.

So we got concho back to campus we relative ease, but weren’t exactly sure how to use it. We knew we wanted to feed our compostable disposables through it, but didn’t know how to do it without making a huge mess, because as you can see the materials feed out of the very bottom of the unit, very low to the ground. But with a little ingenuity and our trusty forklift, we were able to raise Concho above the Earthub hatch, and feed materials directly into the Earthtub. We’re hoping this will add a more favorable element to our mix.
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Local Offerings August 19th

Welcome Back!

With summer growing season in full swing, we have a plethora of offerings for all of our locavores on campus.

We are pulling produce from all over the state: delicious watermelons from the east and mountain peaches from the west. We’d also like to welcome back Eastern Carolina Organics this week with Heirloom Apples, Black Cherry Tomatoes, and other local treats including fresh goat cheese from Celebrity Dairy in Silar City, NC.

Frank Massey will also be in on Saturday with a load of his fresh ground grass fed beef.

Eastern Carolina Organics
Buncombe Heritage Apples – Raven Rock Farms
Mountain Boomer Heritage Apples – Raven Rock Farms
Organic Sweet Italia Red Peppers – Timberwood Organics
Organic Black Cherry Tomatoes – Timberwood Organics
Organic Butternut Squash – Cottle Organics
Plain Goat Chevre – Celebrity Dairy

Gann Farms

Watermelon
Cantaloupe
Yellow Squash
Green Squash
Tomatoes
Cucumbers
Cabbage
Peaches

Know what fats you need

Sherri Meyer, MG Registered Dietitian

A recent MG conference call about essential fatty acids got me thinking.  How many people actually know what essential fats are?  More specifically how many people know the difference between omega 3 fatty acids and omega 6 fatty acids?  The consumer information is confusing and often misleading.  We are told to choose unsaturated fats over saturated fats and eliminate trans fat, simple, right?!  Well actually it’s more complex then that.  
 
There are specific types of unsaturated fats that are essential…meaning we cannot make them on our own and must ingest them through our diet.   Two essential polyunsaturated fats are omega 3 and omega 6 fatty acids.
Omega-3 fatty acids are polyunsaturated fatty acids that are essential for health. We need omega-3 fatty acids for normal body functions such as controlling blood clotting. Omega-3 fatty acids are also associated with benefits like protection against heart disease and possibly stroke. Omega 3 fatty acids are thought to reduce inflammation, which is thought to contribute to various diseases such as heart disease & cancer.   More recently, omega 3 fatty acids have been associated with decreased rates of depression.
The three most nutritionally important omega-3 fatty acids are eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) & alpha-linolenic acid (ALA). Omega-3 fatty acids come mainly from the fat of cold-water fish such as salmon, sardines, herring, mackerel, black cod, and bluefish. Cold-water fish contain the two critically important omega-3 fatty acids, (EPA and or DHA). There are vegetarian sources that contain the omega 3 fatty acid ALA.  These sources include walnuts, canola oil, flaxseeds & some green vegetables such as Brussels sprouts, kale, spinach & salad, which contain a precursor omega-3 (ALA) that the body partially converts to EPA and DHA.   It is recommended that we consume one omega 3 fatty acid source per day.   If you do not consume any fish products, you may want to speak with your doctor about essential fatty acid supplementation.

Omega 6 fatty acids are also polyunsaturated fatty acids that are essential for health. Omega 6 fatty acids are abundant in the Western diet; common sources include safflower, corn, cottonseed & soybeans oils.  These oils, specifically soybean oil are often used in processed foods such as cookies, cakes & snack crackers.  Research has suggested that we are consuming too much omega 6 & not enough omega 3 fatty acids. This dietary imbalance may explain the rise of such diseases that stem from inflammation such a coronary artery disease & various cancers.   Too much omega 6 is thought to promote inflammation, but there is some evidence to suggest otherwise. There are benefits to omega 6 fatty acids such as lowering LDL (“lousy”) cholesterol, hence providing protection against heart disease.  So there is benefit to consumption of omega 6 fatty acids, but we have clearly been consuming too much in the form of processed foods.
 
For now the solution is quite simple:  increase your intake of the healthy omega 3 fatty acids (consume more fish & vegetables) and reduce your consumption of processed foods.