Monthly Archive for: ‘February, 2015’

Stop Focusing on the Actual Goal

Beach-denise-credit

For a company that is wild about wildly important goals…say what?!?

You need a goal (or two, but not more than 3!) and it needs to be measurable. The process of identifying and agreeing upon a goal (what can be even better, cleaner, tastier, safer) brings focus…to everyone. And, by the way…”focus” is the single word to which both Warren Buffett and Bill Gates attribute their success — not determination, not smarts, not courage, not creativity — but focus. 
BUT, to achieve your goal? Spend your time focusing on your “systems“.

“If you’re a coach, your goal is to win a championship. Your system is what your team does at practice each day…When you focus on the practice instead of the performance, you can enjoy the present moment and improve at the same time. None of this is to say that goals are useless…goals are good for planning your progress, while systems are good for actually making progress.” 

So, you have a goal…pulse-check…what are your systems for achieving it and maintaining the desired result? Focus, focus and refocus on that.

Focus on Eating Real Food

veggies

Even a science based professional finds their head spinning with all the contradictory information about dietary fats.

Recently another study was published disputing years of recommendations to keep our total fat consumption to less than 30% and saturated-fat to less than 10% of our calorie intake. Although this particular study I am referring to was not the ideal way to measure the effect of dietary fat on cardiac mortality (i.e. death), it helps put things in perspective. Rather than demonizing one specific macronutrient, be it carbohydrate, fat, or protein, we should focus on eating whole food. When we consume whole food we naturally eliminate processed foods with little nutritional value. Perhaps this is another lesson to teach us that it is far better to focus on real food rather than individual nutrients. When you eat a balance of real food there is no need to count carbohydrates, protein or fat because you naturally get what you need.

Bottom line, consume whole foods such as meat, fish, eggs, dairy products, nuts and seeds, vegetables and fruits and whole grains; and limit (or avoid) consumption of processed foods. You don’t need a science background to understand that.

Focus on Eating Real Food

veggies

Even a science based professional finds their head spinning with all the contradictory information about dietary fats.

Recently another study was published disputing years of recommendations to keep our total fat consumption to less than 30% and saturated-fat to less than 10% of our calorie intake. Although this particular study I am referring to was not the ideal way to measure the effect of dietary fat on cardiac mortality (i.e. death), it helps put things in perspective. Rather than demonizing one specific macronutrient, be it carbohydrate, fat, or protein, we should focus on eating whole food. When we consume whole food we naturally eliminate processed foods with little nutritional value. Perhaps this is another lesson to teach us that it is far better to focus on real food rather than individual nutrients. When you eat a balance of real food there is no need to count carbohydrates, protein or fat because you naturally get what you need.

Bottom line, consume whole foods such as meat, fish, eggs, dairy products, nuts and seeds, vegetables and fruits and whole grains; and limit (or avoid) consumption of processed foods. You don’t need a science background to understand that.

Come Together

come-together-2

Whether you watch football or not, chances are you heard a lot of hype during the last two weeks. This year there was plenty to discuss and debate. Emotions can run very high when folks have strong feelings about “their team,” and with the opinions around “deflate-gate” there was more “who are you cheering for?” buzzing around.

How does this relate to our business?

How often do you see something differently from your colleague, employee, client? Every day we are faced with different opinions, beliefs, viewpoints and preferences. Sometimes, these differences are in areas we feel very strongly, if not passionately about.  What if someone criticizes “your team” or your work?

There are many scenarios and opportunities for folks to disagree. But what we do and how we react makes all the difference in how we work together:

  • Will you listen to what the other person has to say completely before landing on what you think?
  • Do you really hear how the other person feels and why?
  • Do you want to understand where they are coming from?
  • Can you be accepting of their opinion even if it differs from yours?
  • Can you let go of the fact that they may not agree with you?

The more we can answer yes to these questions, the further we will all go. Reaching yes gets easier and easier as we focus on CV#5.  Regardless of how we feel about a situation, we can always Be Kind, Be Positive, and Be Gracious. 

Yes, even when we are cheering for different teams we can do that.

Clean Eating Tips

veggies

Clean Eating. This is a term that is overused & misused extensively.  The best “definition” (I use this term loosely) is by Eating Well’s registered dietitian.  Clean eating is “about eating more of the best and healthiest options in each of the food groups—and eating less of the not-so-healthy ones. That means embracing foods like vegetables, fruits and whole grains, plus healthy proteins and fats. It also means cutting back on refined (i.e. processed) grains, added sugars, salt and unhealthy fats. And since you don’t have to count calories or give up whole food groups, it’s easy to follow.”

Clean Eating Tips:

Limit processed foods

Bump up your vegetables

Cut down on saturated fat

Reduce alcohol intake

Un-sweeten your diet

Watch the salt

Choose whole grains

Up your fruit intake

Nix refined grains

For more specific information click on this link to view the slide show and to browse delicious lunch recipes. 

Kale Butternut Chopped Salad

Slider_February15

Serves 8

1     butternut squash, peel, cut ó”

2 T  olive oil

Salt & pepper

10 c tuscan kale, chopped

½ c  dried cranberries, coarsely chopped

½ c  pumpkin seeds, toasted

½ c  feta cheese, small crumbles

¾ c  vinaigrette (balsamic or champagne)

 

1. Preheat oven to 400°F

2. Toss squash, olive oil, s&p. Roast for 20 mins, cool

3. Mix kale with 2 T vinaigrette, marinate for 20 mins

4. Toss chopped kale, squash, cranberries, pumpkin seeds, more vinaigrette