Monthly Archive for: ‘August, 2019’

The Persistence of Diet Culture

As I gear myself to head “back to school” with the local college students, I am reminded of the importance of my work, which includes counseling for students with nutritional issues. A great majority of my clients are students who battle with body image struggles, the majority of which began in childhood.  The lifelong effects of dieting at such young ages have been detrimental to their mental & physical health. When I first began my career as a registered dietitian, I never imagined I would view dieting as a negative. As aspiring dietitians, we were taught that fat is always equivalent to poor health & the final goal was a “healthy” bodyweight, which really was code for thin. Luckily, scientific research & clinical experience has proved us wrong. There are many different body types that are considered healthy & many of those don’t fall under the standards of what society considers “skinny.”  As a responsible clinician I feel it is my duty to educate others about the importance of healthy living that does not involve any form of dieting.  That is why this op-ed was so profound for me.  Christy Harrison I a registered dietitian whose practice focuses on helping clients recover from disordered eating. I strongly encourage you to read these op-eds written by Harrison in response to the release of Kurbo, a kids “dieting” app released by Weight Watchers.

Why you should never give your kids this app

It’s the way we were born eating

Just a few takeaways:

“As a registered dietitian who specializes in helping people recover from disordered eating, I strongly recommend that parents keep this new tool — and any weight-loss program — away from their children.

Our society is unfair and cruel to people who are in larger bodies, so I can empathize with parents who might believe their child needs to lose weight, and with any child who wants to. Unfortunately, attempts to shrink a child’s body are likely to be both ineffective and harmful to physical and mental health.

Over the last 60 years, numerous studies have shown that among people who lose weight, more than 90 percent gain it back over the long run. For example, a 2000 study [CW: weight-stigmatizing language and numbers used] of adults 20 to 45 found that less than 5 percent lost weight and kept it off long term. And a 2015 study [CW] of more than 176,000 higher-weight people age 20 and older found that 95 percent to 98 percent of those who lost weight gained back all of it (or more) within five years. A 2007 review [CW] of the scientific evidence found that most people likely gained back more.”

The post The Persistence of Diet Culture is by Sherri Meyer, Corporate Dietitian and appeared first on Meriwether Godsey.

Citrus, Fennel, & Chickpea Salad

Serves 4

Ingredients

1 large fennel bulb, very thinly sliced
(15 oz) can chickpeas, drained & rinsed
3 celery stalks, very thinly sliced
½ c fresh flat leaf parsley, chopped
4 T fresh lemon juice
4 T olive oil
½ c grated parmesan
s&p

Procedure

1. Toss together fennel, chickpeas, celery, parsley, lemon juice & olive oil.
2. Season with s&p to taste, chill.
3. Before serving sprinkle with grated parmesan.

The post Citrus, Fennel, & Chickpea Salad is by Denise Simmons, Corporate Executive Chef and appeared first on Meriwether Godsey.

Hedgehogs and Such

I’m a big fan of The 5 Chairs (and Louise Evans). The second chair is self-doubt (the hedgehog), and so this article caught my eye:  what to do when you doubt yourself as a leader.  As leaders, we’re all human and we all suffer from self-doubt from time to time. It’s what you do in those situations that matters most. The article offers some tips for managing this common feeling:

Breakdowns can lead to breakthroughs. Sometimes you need to get to a low point to make the adjustments you need to move to the next level in your personal development.

Ride the Wave. Don’t beat yourself up for feeling anxious.  Self-doubt is natural, common, and often a sign of humility. Probe what you’re feeling.  When am I doubtful?  Who am I with when I feel it most? In what situations?

Share with someone you trust. Sharing allows you to process out loud and to hear outside perspective.

If you can’t change a situation, you have to change yourself. Practice focus and discipline in your work and try to do at least one thing every day to fuel your sense of accomplishment. Over time, it will boost your self-confidence.

Leslie Phillips

CEO

The post Hedgehogs and Such is by Leslie Phillips, Chief Executive Officer and appeared first on Meriwether Godsey.

The Best Intentions

An exciting part of our business is that we really are a collection of many businesses — from NC to MA. We have different accents, climates, favorite teams, and yes, food preferences. But, this also means that face time with one another is, regrettably, infrequent. We use other tools to stay in touch: zoom, phone, email-text-slack-chat. All fine, but…these methods increase our risk for miscommunication. Two things are in play:  intent and impact. When delivering and receiving messages we often think these are aligned. The person delivering assumes the other understands their intent. The person receiving assumes the impact of the message (on them) is what was intended. When it comes to any communication that is not in person we lose cues: eye contact, facial expressions, body language. And when we use non-verbal alternatives like email and text, we lose those and more: tone of voice, speech patterns, fluidity found in conversation. So a few things to practice:

  • Share your intent up-front
  • Pause to consider the impact of your messages – look for cues that you may have been misunderstood and talk about it
  • If your impact was not as intended, don’t over-explain your intent, start empathizing. “I can see how my message came across that way.”
  • Remember this: we read emails and texts in a tone of voice, and imagining the other party’s facial expression. These assumptions can be very wrong. Don’t let them carry you away.
  • Alternative tools are great, but….keep your “pick up the phone” radar turned on and listen to it!

Leslie Phillips
CEO

The post The Best Intentions is by Leslie Phillips, Chief Executive Officer and appeared first on Meriwether Godsey.

Bacon & Heirloom Tomato Beurre Blanc

Makes 1½ cup

Ingredients

½ c dry white wine
2 T shallot, finely chopped
⅓ c heavy cream
¼ t salt
⅛ t white pepper
1 c unsalted butter, sliced, chilled
fresh lemon juice
2 strip bacon, cooked, drained, crumbled
½ c heirloom cherry tomatoes, quartered

Procedure

1. Combine wine & shallots in sauté pan. Bring to boil, reduce, simmer until syrup consistency.
2. Add heavy cream, reduce to sauce consistency, about ½ volume started with.
3. Medium low heat, slowly add butter pieces, whipping constantly.
4. Season to taste with salt, pepper & lemon juice. Add bacon & tomatoes. Serve warm.

The post Bacon & Heirloom Tomato Beurre Blanc is by Denise Simmons, Corporate Executive Chef and appeared first on Meriwether Godsey.