Author Archive for: ‘Leslie Phillips, Chief Executive Officer’

Niksen

What? Niksen is Dutch for “nothing,” and it appears in this article, The Case for Doing Nothing. Being busy gets confused with being important and it’s causing us all issues, some of them major like burnout (especially for millennials), anxiety disorders, and stress-related diseases.

Daydreaming — an inevitable effect of idleness — literally makes us more creative, better at problem-solving…more productive.  

Tips to help you stop and be:

  • Make time for doing nothing, and do it with purpose
  • Be unapologetic that you are doing…nothing
  • Sitting still might be uncomfortable at first, practice
  • Create the right place – devices out of reach, a perching spot you like (at home, at work, in a park…)

Get busy niksening.

Leslie Phillips
CEO

The Goldilocks Question

“Success doesn’t come from playing to your strengths.  It comes from playing your strengths in the right situations.”  

This article references a study where co-workers rated their managers in four leadership areas:  taking charge, empowering others, creating a vision and executing.  They used the Goldilocks question:  did the managers do too little, too much, or the right amount of each behavior.  More than half were overdoing at least one behavior.  Guess which one?  Their strength.  

Ambitious managers?  Overdid decisiveness and underdid empowerment. Sensitive managers?  The reverse: they were too encouraging and not assertive enough. Inquisitive managers overemphasized innovation and underemphasized results. And conscientious managers also did the reverse: they were so busy trimming the weeds that they paid too little attention to the big picture.  

“Often our greatest weaknesses are the other side of our strengths…if you’re a spellbinding storyteller, you need to ask whether a dinner party is an ideal time to perform!”  

More areas to practice self-awareness and self-management.  Day by day, we are humbled by all the opportunities to learn, grow and improve.

Leslie Phillips
CEO

EQ, PQ?

We have been talking a lot about EQ, lately: self-awareness, self-management, be kind and empathize with others (always).

But, what about PQ or BQ? I’m talking about physical or body intelligence. Recently I found myself saying to someone half my age: keep in mind that your body of tomorrow is a direct result of the choices you make today. And, alas, a day later I saw this article in my news feed: exercise helps you live longer no matter when you start.

The good news continues. It is never too late. This is true of EQ and PQ. If you really want to have better relationships (now and tomorrow), take a step forward… maybe that first step is as simple as asking more questions and listening. If you want to feel better or make an investment in that body of tomorrow, take a step forward… whether it’s getting a move on or kicking a habit that no longer serves you. It is never… too late.

Leslie Phillips
CEO

Ahhh-wareness

Maintaining (or improving) our relationships, work and personal, is directly tied to how emotionally intelligent we are. And how emotionally intelligent we are starts with our self-awareness. But how easy is it to be self-aware? How accurate are you at diagnosing whether your mood and behaviors are picking people up or dragging them down? Before you interact with others (arrive at work or walk in the restaurant to meet your best friend) check in with yourself. How am I feeling: positive and upbeat? Tired and deflated? Full of dread or doubt? Thankful? Resentful? Whatever the answer, you are now yours to manage. Your excitement might not match your team’s (or your friend’s). Help them get there by staying in the light. On the other hand, your dread is a downer. Do everything in your power to find something positive to focus on and start there. A great place to look? The effort of a teammate. By praising effort, you create an environment where teammates believe anything is possible.

“Awareness is the greatest agent for change.” —Eckhart Tolle

Leslie Phillips
CEO

Conflict Competence

Can you be kind, positive and gracious, and have conflict or need to share difficult feedback? Dealing with conflict in a constructive fashion is a form of kindness — to the parties involved, to the team, and to the organization. But, research shows that 95% of the workforce (that means each one of us) avoid difficult conversations. And…every avoided conversation costs 8 hours of productivity. Yikes, how do we do better? Conflict Competence is a skill to be developed. A growth mindset means believing you can improve your abilities. If you feel you “aren’t good” at difficult, honest, direct conversations – try again, you will get better at it. Talk to someone you admire in this regard.  And, empower your team to do the same.

We all struggle with conflict, but the path to becoming conflict competent is to first adopt the right mindset, learn the skills and practice. With the right support system, a company can shift from a costly culture of avoidance to a prosperous culture of quick course-correction.

Leslie Phillips
CEO

 

Conflict Competence

Can you be kind, positive and gracious, and have conflict or need to share difficult feedback? Dealing with conflict in a constructive fashion is a form of kindness — to the parties involved, to the team, and to the organization. But, research shows that 95% of the workforce (that means each one of us) avoid difficult conversations. And…every avoided conversation costs 8 hours of productivity. Yikes, how do we do better? Conflict Competence is a skill to be developed. A growth mindset means believing you can improve your abilities. If you feel you “aren’t good” at difficult, honest, direct conversations – try again, you will get better at it. Talk to someone you admire in this regard.  And, empower your team to do the same.

We all struggle with conflict, but the path to becoming conflict competent is to first adopt the right mindset, learn the skills and practice. With the right support system, a company can shift from a costly culture of avoidance to a prosperous culture of quick course-correction.

Leslie Phillips
CEO

 

Brand Intelligence

We talk a lot about “brand” at MG. Lately, we’ve put even more focus on what that means because it’s way more than chef dude or interesting composed salads or signs on kraft paper. Yes, those are things we hope people recognize us for, but it’s way more. This article – What does your corporate brand stand for – reinforces why this is so important. Our brand is what we stand for and how others perceive we are doing with that (our reputation!). It’s critical that a company know their “brand core”:  what do we promise and how do we express that?

We have ten core values, but they are all summed up in our overarching goal:  to make a difference every day. From how we appreciate people to how we love food and our planet…this will never go out of style.

Leslie Phillips
CEO

Be Curious

As the holidays approach, friends begin to share pictures of their young children with Santa. These pictures are often touching and humorous, all at the same time. Their faces. Some scared, some excited, some curious. Children are curious. They ask a lot of questions like, “how does Santa fly around the world delivering all those presents with just a sleigh pulled by 8 reindeer?”

“Questions ‘ignite curiosity” (see my last post). And this article echoes that point.
When our curiosity is triggered, we are less likely to fall prey to confirmation bias (looking for information that supports our beliefs rather than for evidence suggesting we are wrong) and to stereotyping people.

The research maintains that if you start your day asking yourself, what is one topic I am curious about today vs. what is one thing I’ll complete today…you will be more innovative. So go ahead, be curious. Challenge YOUR status quo and invite your team to do the same.

Leslie Phillips, ESQ
CEO

What’s Your Question?

We are taught at a very young age that having the right answers is really, really important. Since 1984, Alex Trebek (of Jeopardy!) has entertained millions of viewers who love hearing him ask questions for which there is a right answer. But life and work? Not so much. Both are full of….gray. Possible solutions, different approaches, and very little pure right or wrong.

So then, how do we let loose of having to have the answers? We ask questions.
Questions “ignite curiosity, which comes before solutions…The rehashing of old ideas produces stability at first and stagnation in the end.”
Use questions to share ideas and values. Questions like: what makes this important to you, what would you like to do about that, how can I help you?

Yes, leaders help solve problems. But more importantly, leaders explore possibilities.

Leslie Phillips, ESQ
CEO

The Feels

Lately across the MG globe, we have been taking extra steps to educate about the power of emotional intelligence (EQ).  Seems it’s on a lot of people’s minds as we see, hear, and experience ourselves…strong emotions.  This article provides yet another angle on how important EQ is:

In the past, it was thought that people with higher IQ would outperform people with lower IQ…(but), research showed that people with higher IQ outperformed people with lower IQ only about 20% of the time, while people with lower IQ outperformed people with higher IQ 70% of the time…Emotional intelligence is the ability to recognize one’s emotions and the emotions of others and to manage those emotions to achieve more effective results. You could simply ask yourself, “In a moment of high or negative emotion, do I have my feelings or do they have me?”

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