Author Archive for: ‘smeyer’

Wednesday Wisdom – March 23

March 23, 2011Meriwether Godsey Wednesday Wisdom Sherri Meyer, MG Registered Dietitian The right foods can keep your brain young. Aim for colorful veggies.
  • Carrots to keep you cognitive. Along with bell peppers, celery, rosemary & thyme.
  • Beets to boost brain power. Also cabbages & radishes.
  • Asparagus “spares” memory. Plus leafy greens.

Weekly Wisdom – March 21 – 25, 2011

March 23, 2011
Sherri Meyer, MG Registered Dietitian

The right foods can keep your brain young. Aim for colorful veggies.

  • Carrots to keep you cognitive. Along with bell peppers, celery, rosemary & thyme.
  • Beets to boost brain power. Also cabbages & radishes.
  • Asparagus “spares” memory. Plus leafy greens.

Weekly Wisdom – March 16

March 16, 2011
Sherri Meyer, MG Registered Dietitian

Don’t Detox!

A detox diet (i.e.“crash diet”) can actually raise stress hormones which may lead to a binge later. Any weight loss is mostly water.

Science does not support detox diets to remove toxins from your body - that is the job of your liver & kidneys

To jump start your weight loss:

  • aim for 3 small meals from nutrient rich foods
  • fruit as snacks
  • 1200-1500 calorie

Wednesday Wisdom – March 16

March 16, 2011Meriwether Godsey Wednesday Wisdom Sherri Meyer, MG Registered Dietitian Don’t Detox! A detox diet (i.e.“crash diet”) can actually raise stress hormones which may lead to a binge later. Any weight loss is mostly water. Science does not support detox diets to remove toxins from your body - that is the job of your liver & kidneys To jump start your weight loss:
  • aim for 3 small meals from nutrient rich foods
  • fruit as snacks
  • 1200-1500 calorie

Allergy or Intolerance?

March 14, 2011
Sherri Meyer, MG Registered Dietitian

The other day I found my son Oliver in the refrigerator dipping his fingers in the peanut butter jar. He has declared peanut butter his new found love and has informed me he doesn’t require a medium other than his fingers to partake. Unfortunately, much of that sticky peanut butter ends up on his clothes (who needs napkins?). So, when his daily snack request for preschool includes peanut butter, I have to gently remind him of the “no peanut butter” rule due to allergies. Oliver doesn’t quite get the food allergy concept and often concludes with “they can have peanut butter when they get big.” Oliver does not yet know this is not the case. Unlike milk, wheat, soy, and egg allergies, which most children outgrow, peanut allergies are usually for life.

All of this got me thinking about the latest information on food allergies vs. food intolerances, and I found a great article by Mary Saucier Choate, M.S., R.D., L.D., which I’ve adapted here. For those of us in the food business, it’s important that we can distinguish the difference.

Food Allergies & Food Intolerances
Often, food intolerance is mistaken for food allergy. Food intolerance is more common than true food allergy. According to the Food Allergy Initiative, a food allergy results when the immune system misreads a harmless food protein (an allergen) as a threat and attacks it. Specifically, if you have a food allergy, the immune system manufactures abnormally high amounts of an antibody called immunoglobulin E (IgE), which fights the “enemy” food allergen by releasing histamine and other chemicals, causing the symptoms of an allergic reaction. If you are very sensitive, eating even a very small amount of a food allergen can cause a serious reaction.

In contrast, a food intolerance, such as celiac disease (gluten intolerance) or lactose (milk sugar) intolerance does not involve immunoglobulin E antibodies. An individualwith food intolerance can generally consume a tiny amount of the offending food without experiencing symptoms. However, the specific amount differs for each individual.

While many foods can trigger a food allergy, the top eight foods that cause allergies are: cow’s milk, eggs, peanuts, wheat, soy, fish, shellfish, and tree nuts.
Symptoms of a food allergy include:

  • A rash, or red, itchy skin
  • Stuffy or itchy nose, sneezing, or itchy and teary eyes
  • Vomiting, stomach cramps or diarrhea
  • Facial swelling


Some can have a serious reaction called anaphylaxis. Anaphylaxis is a severe, potentially fatal allergic reaction. According to the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, food allergy is the leading cause of anaphylaxis. Anaphylaxis should always be treated as a medical emergency.

The following food intolerances are often mistakenly called food allergies:
Lactose Intolerance

Lactose intolerance: the inability to properly digest the naturally occurring sugar in milk (lactose). This is caused by missing or low levels of lactase enzymes, which normally break down the lactose sugar during digestion. Because the lactose is not broken down effectively, it is fermented by colon bacteria. This results in gas, and causes symptoms of bloating, abdominal pain, and sometimes diarrhea.

Food Additive Sensitivity
Added preservatives and flavor enhancers such as monosodium glutamate (MSG) and sulfites can cause symptoms that can be mistaken for food allergy symptoms. Sulfites are preservatives that are added to foods and also are naturally occurring in certain foods. Symptoms of sulfite intolerance can occur within 15-30 minutes after consumption. Adverse reactions to sulfites in people without asthma are extremely rare.

Gluten Intolerance
Gluten intolerance, a hereditary disease, is also known as celiac disease, celiac sprue, or gluten-sensitive enteropathy. Gluten is a protein in wheat, barley, and rye. When a person with celiac disease eats a gluten-containing food, the immune system responds by damaging the lining of the nutrient-absorbing small intestine. This damage leads to serious nutrient deficiencies that can remain undetected for a long time. The treatment for celiac disease is a gluten-free diet. Gluten intolerance involves an auto-immune reaction, but the IgE antibody is not involved, so this is not considered to be a true food allergy, rather an intolerance.

Wednesday Wisdom – March 9

March 09, 2011Meriwether Godsey Wednesday Wisdom Sherri Meyer, MG Registered Dietitian When stressed, reach for foods that soothe your psyche & stomach:
  • Oatmeal: Packed with fiber, oats regulate digestion & guard against dips in blood sugar
  • Yogurt: Contains probiotics which may have beneficial affect on mind-gut connection
  • Fatty Fish: Omega 3 fatty acids can help relieve inflammation linked to stomach woes

Weekly Wisdom – March 9

March 09, 2011
Sherri Meyer, MG Registered Dietitian

When stressed, reach for foods that soothe your psyche & stomach:

  • Oatmeal: Packed with fiber, oats regulate digestion & guard against dips in blood sugar
  • Yogurt: Contains probiotics which may have beneficial affect on mind-gut connection
  • Fatty Fish: Omega 3 fatty acids can help relieve inflammation linked to stomach woes

 



 

Weekly Wisdom – March 2

March 02, 2011
Sherri Meyer, MG Registered Dietitian

DHA, an Omega 3 fat, may lower the risk of periodontitis (inflammation of gums that can lead to bone & tooth loss)

  • DHA is highest in fatty fish like salmon
  • Aim for 2 servings a week, and also lower your risk of heart disease!



 

Wednesday Wisdom – March 2

March 02, 2011
Sherri Meyer, MG Registered Dietitian

DHA, an Omega 3 fat, may lower the risk of periodontitis (inflammation of gums that can lead to bone & tooth loss)

  • DHA is highest in fatty fish like salmon
  • Aim for 2 servings a week, and also lower your risk of heart disease!



 

The Big 5 in Nutrition Labels

Recently I was teaching my college nutrition students how to read a food label. Given that it is a science-based nutrition course, we were getting more technical than the average label reader usually does. I was afraid that food label reading was going to be too basic for them, so imagine my surprise when they revealed to me how little they know about translating a food label into making smart choices. Granted, the food label does contain a lot of information that can be confusing to the average consumer & requires more “sifting” than one may prefer to do when making food choices. The government is in the process of revising the label, but one never knows how long that process may take. So it was very timely that I came across this article that listed the top 5 items to look at when reading a label. Helpful information – happy reading!

1 and 2. Serving Size & Servings Per Package: Without looking at what a “serving” is supposed to be in the package, everything else on the label is irrelevant. This is the one thing that most consumers completely overlook until they realize that they just ate two, 450-calorie servings of pizza. Oops.
Many packages that appear like they would serve one, may actually have two or more portions. (This is one of the pet peeves of the FDA and IOM have about current packages that they want to change.) Having “servings per package” and “calories per package” boldly present on the front panel would help solve this issue.

3.Calories: That’s obvious. Many of us are overweight and virtually everyone has to be aware of calories, so be sure to look at it before buying. As a general rule, consider that meals should be 450-650 calories and snacks less than 200 calories.

4. Saturated Fat: Try to choose foods that provide low numbers for saturated fat. Most women need no more than 15-17 grams sat fat per day. Full-fat cheese is the number one source in the US diet, followed by pizza so keep that in mind.

5.Sodium: You’ll quickly find out that the less processed a food, the lower the sodium will be. Watching sodium will automatically improve your diet as you’ll be eating more foods that are less processed or naturally fresh and sodium-free.

Source: appforhealth.com

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