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Quinoa Cakes

Serves 6

2T olive oil

1 onion, finely chopped

3 cloves garlic, finely chopped

2½c cooked, chilled quinoa

14oz can black beans, drained & rinsed

3lg eggs, beaten

½t fine sea salt

1/3c fresh chives, chopped

1/4c grated parmesan

1/4c goat cheese

2c gluten free bread crumbs

1T olive oil or clarified butter

 

1. Combine quinoa, eggs, black beans & salt in bowl

2. Lightly sautée onion & garlic in oil, DO NOT brown

3. Add onions to quinoa, stir in other ingredients (except oil/butter)

4. Form into 12, 2″ patties. Best chilled before cooking

5. Heat oil/butter in skillet, med high, sautée 3 mins per side

Serve with red onion marmalade, tomato chutney, and/or horseradish cream

Superpower

Guess what leadership “interaction skill” has the most impact on a team member’s job performance…clarifies details?  Encourages involvement? Supports? Develops others’ ideas? No, no, no. And no.
 
Listens and responds with empathy.

Yep. That’s it. And it’s a bona fide superpower.
[It] is not just about being able to see things from another perspective. It’s the cornerstone of teamwork, good innovative design, and smart leadership. It’s about helping others feel heard and understood.
 
Even Albert Einstein agrees, “empathy is patiently seeing the world through the other person’s eyes. It is not learned in school; it is cultivated over a lifetime.”

Veggie Moroccan Stew

Serves 8

1T olive oil

3/4c ea diced carrots & yukon potatoes

1½c ea diced eggplant & butternut squash

½c ea diced mushrooms & leek

1/4dried cranberries, raisins or prunes

14oz can chickpeas, rinsed

14oz can diced tomatoes

1C veggie broth

2t ea cumin, coriander, paprika

1 cinnamon stick

pinch crushed red pepper, s&p

Garnishes

1/4C fresh parsley

1/4C sliced almonds

 

1. Sautée veggies in oil, over med heat, 8-10 mins

2. Add other ingredients (except garnishes), bring to boil

3. Reduce to simmer, cook 20-30 mins

4. Remove cinnamon stick

5. Serve over basmati rice or couscous

6. Top with fresh parsley & almonds

Note: cut veggies small dice, ½”

The Eager Eater

Life is busy, for all of us.  Multitasking is the story of my life and one thing I can say with a definitive conclusion is that most of the time I don’t do it well. I find every aspect of my life improves when I tackle one task at a time simply by slowing down & paying attention. This certainly applies to eating. Many of us find ourselves rushing through our meals without giving the food we eat much of a second thought.  How can we change?  Below are a few strategies (adapted from Rebel Dietitians) for learning how to eat without distraction.
 
7 Ways to Stop Multitasking While you Eat
 
1. Take a few deep breaths-this could apply to everything we do.  Take a few deep breaths & focus on the task at hand (eating).
 
2. Ask yourself what you are hungry fornormal eating is actually consuming foods you enjoy. Basing your food choices solely on health only leads to overall dissatisfaction to your palate & the endless quest for satisfaction.
 

3. Set the table and plate your food-make your meal an actual dining experience.  Plate your food instead of picking.
 

4. Engage all your senses while eating
 

5. Taste your food-multitasking while you eat actually inhibits the pleasure you derive from eating.  Before you know it, your meal is finished, yet you can’t quite seem to remember what your food tasted like (or even how much you ate).
 
6. Think about ways you could explain this food to someone who has never seen it before.
 

7. Pause in the middle of eating for at least two minutes-in other words, slow down.  Remember your brain takes about 20 minutes to register that your body is full.

Stop Focusing on the Actual Goal

For a company that is wild about wildly important goals…say what?!?
 
You need a goal (or two, but not more than 3!) and it needs to be measurable. The process of identifying and agreeing upon a goal (what can be even better, cleaner, tastier, safer) brings focus…to everyone. And, by the way…”focus” is the single word to which both Warren Buffet and Bill Gates attribute their success — not determination, not smarts, not courage, not creativity — but focus.
 
BUT, to achieve your goal? Spend your time focusing on your “systems”.
 
“If you’re a coach, your goal is to win a championship. Your system is what your team does at practice each day…When you focus on the practice instead of the performance, you can enjoy the present moment and improve at the same time. None of this is to say that goals are useless…goals are good for planning your progress, while systems are good for actually making progress.”
 
So, you have a goal…pulse-check…what are your systems for achieving it and maintaining the desired result? Focus, focus and refocus on that.

A Twist on Tradition

Before Valentines, take time to read “True love starts in the kitchen“… with Chef Anne from Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden, highlighted in Richmond Times-Dispatch! Sink your teeth into these Valentines Day foods with a makeover.

Bacon Bourbon Jam

12oz bacon, diced

½c onion, diced

pinch salt

3T brown sugar

2T bourbon (Maker’s Mark best)

2½c chicken stock

1T butter

 

1. In medium stock pot, cook bacon until it begins to crisp, 5-7 mins

2. Add onion & salt, cook 5 mins

3. Add bourbon & brown sugar, stir

4. Crank heat high, add 1 c stock, stir until liquid is almost gone, 7 mins

5. Add 1 more c stock, repeat

6. When “jammy” consistency, add last ½ c stock

7. Blend mixture in blender to smooth

8. Return to pan, cook on low 7 mins

9. Remove from heat & stir in butter

Excellent on steaks or other grilled or roasted meats

The One Thing You Can Count On

January 1. New calendars go up. We write 16…scratch through, no, 17. Eventually it becomes natural. We think about the year behind and the year ahead – to ourselves – out loud – maybe both. We make a resolution to change something — or consciously decide not to.

And yet, the one thing we can count on in life…every single one of us…is change. It’s happening whether we like it or not, embrace it or not, believe it or not.

“The secret of change
is to focus all of your energy,
not on fighting the old, but
on building the new.”
– Dan Millman

Here’s to a New Year!

“Good” or “Bad” Food

Driving in a car with four children with varying musical tastes doesn’t give me much time for educational podcasts; however, there are a few stolen moments where I can listen to topics of interest without background commentary. This recent podcast by the Foodist really peaked my interest. How to Stop Moralizing Your Food Choices by Darya Rose. This is topic is something I believe many of us can relate too, how many times have we deemed our food choices “good” or “bad”. Demoralized ourself for eating too much or making the wrong food choice. Additionally, Rose talks about not demonizing real food (she uses the example of sweet potatoes and oatmeal). This is a topic that comes up all too frequently in the world of nutrition. Many diet plans mislead consumers to believe that certain whole, plant based foods are not beneficial, perhaps even harmful. Nutritious real foods should never be avoided unless one has a food intolerance of allergy. Additionally, avoiding real food in favor of weight loss shakes or other food substitutes takes away the pleasure that we should all derive from eating food.

Check out this podcast next time you have a free moment (or in the car with a child, who knows you may bring out the budding scientist in them).

“A Smorgasbord for Seniors” by Megan L. Horst

Dining_room_680x300

Take a glance at Lynchburg Living’s article on dining options for senior living facilities. Featuring The Summit and its Director of Dining, Mary Margaret Little!

“A Smorgasbord for Seniors” – Lynchburg Living 

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