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Healthy Baking Ideas

For healthier baking: you can replace the fat in any baking recipe using applesauce. It’s a one-to-one ratio, so simply sub applesauce for the quantity of fat called for. You can also lighten baking recipes by cutting the quantity of sugar called for in half. Chances are, most people won’t even realize it’s gone, and it will reduce calorie count considerably.

Here are a few other ways to lighted up your favorite baked goods:

  • Butter: Canola, mild olive oil, prune purée or applesauce
  • 1 ounce of chocolate: 3 tablespoons cocoa
  • 2 eggs: 1 egg + 2 whites or egg substitute
  • Cream, whole milk (in batters, muffins or biscuit doughs): Skin or lowfat (1%) milk
  • Cream Cheese (in cheesecake): Lowfat ricotta + yogurt; light cream cheese
  • Ricotta cheese, whole-milk: 1/2 whole milk ricotta plus either part-skim ricotta or
  • lowfat (1%) cottage cheese
  • Sour Cream: Plain yogurt
  • Whipped cream, ice cream (to top cakes, pies, warm fruit desserts): Frozen yogurt,
  • Lowfat yogurt
  • 1 cup whipped cream (in mousse mixtures): 3 stiffly beaten egg whites or 3/4 to 1 cup
  • Yogurt Cheese
  • 1 cup whipping or heavy: 1 cup evaporated skim milk cream (for whipping)

Healthy Baking Ideas

For healthier baking: you can replace the fat in any baking recipe using applesauce. It’s a one-to-one ratio, so simply sub applesauce for the quantity of fat called for. You can also lighten baking recipes by cutting the quantity of sugar called for in half. Chances are, most people won’t even realize it’s gone, and it will reduce calorie count considerably.

Here are a few other ways to lighted up your favorite baked goods:

  • Butter: Canola, mild olive oil, prune purée or applesauce
  • 1 ounce of chocolate: 3 tablespoons cocoa
  • 2 eggs: 1 egg + 2 whites or egg substitute
  • Cream, whole milk (in batters, muffins or biscuit doughs): Skin or lowfat (1%) milk
  • Cream Cheese (in cheesecake): Lowfat ricotta + yogurt; light cream cheese
  • Ricotta cheese, whole-milk: 1/2 whole milk ricotta plus either part-skim ricotta or
  • lowfat (1%) cottage cheese
  • Sour Cream: Plain yogurt
  • Whipped cream, ice cream (to top cakes, pies, warm fruit desserts): Frozen yogurt,
  • Lowfat yogurt
  • 1 cup whipped cream (in mousse mixtures): 3 stiffly beaten egg whites or 3/4 to 1 cup
  • Yogurt Cheese
  • 1 cup whipping or heavy: 1 cup evaporated skim milk cream (for whipping)

Dried Cranberry Salad

Serves 8 

1 c – port-soaked dried cranberries
1/4 c – apple cider vinegar
1 T – dijon mustard
1 t – sea salt
1/2 t – freshly ground black pepper
1 c – extra virgin olive oil 


1 qt – mixed salad greens
1/2 c – gorgonzola cheese crumbles
3/4 c – candied pecans 

 

  1. Soak dried cranberries in port wine, at least one hour, drain 
  2. Vinaigrette: Mix vinegar, dijon, sea salt & pepper, whisk in olive oil 
  3. Toss greens with 1/2 of vinaigrette, add more as desired 
  4. Top with cranberries, gorgonzola crumbles & candied pecans 

7 Foods That Help You Fill Up, Not Out – Part 3

  • Eggs: There are a dozen reasons to love eggs like high quality protein to help you feel energized. On average breakfast egg eaters consume less calories (one study reported 330 fewer calories).
  • Nonfat or Lowfat Greek Plain Yogurt: Thicker than regular yogurt & more protein per serving (up to 23 grams per cup). Top with fresh fruit & enjoy.

Source: Michael Pollan: Food Rules

Weekly Wisdom – Food Rules Part 7

Food Rules… Eating what stands on 1 leg
(mushrooms & plant foods) is better than eating what
stands on 2 legs (fowl), which is better than what stands
on 4 legs (cows, pigs & other mammals).

- This proverb offers a good summary regarding the healthfulness of
different types of foods.
- Notice the absences of fish (very healthy & totally legless)
Source: Michael Pollan: Food Rules

Healthy Food Swaps

I’m thinking everyone knows I’m (once again) on a quest to ‘lighten up’ and start treating my body with a bit more respect. While I do feel emotional eating is the biggest part of why many (most) struggle with weight, particularly the very overweight & obese, I still feel these ideas to help lighten up are great for anyone, whether you are on a quest to lose weight, or just want to reduce the empty/worthless calories you consume.

One Small Change: Healthy Swaps for Three Common Cravings
by Jason Machowsky in Healthy Tips, July 15, 2013

What makes junk food so appealing? Emotional eating aside, it often comes down to two things: taste (sweet, salty) and texture (creamy, fizzy, crunchy). In my humble opinion, if we can mimic those qualities in healthier options, then upgrading eating habits becomes an easier task. So let’s tackle three commonly craved foods: soda, chips, and mayonnaise.

The Craving:

Soda. A “refreshing” couple hundred of calories will spike your blood sugar and provide no nutrients. So what keeps us drawn to soda? It’s usually the fizz factor and the sweet taste. Consider which aspects of soda attract you to it, and then find the right substitute.

The Healthy Swaps:

Seltzer or Sparkling Water If you like the fizz, carbonated beverages can serve as a great substitute. Naturally flavored versions are available if you want a taste of orange, berry, lemon-lime and more. Flavored Water If you prefer getting some taste with your fluids but don’t want the fizz, you can easily add some flavor to your water. You can use lemon or lime (fresh or from the squeeze bottle), or a splash of your favorite juice for a little sweetness. You can even use a splash of juice with seltzer too.

The Craving:

Chips. Crunchiness and saltiness are the key components of chips. Unfortunately, chips can also pack lots of extra calories from added oils and frying. Plus, the low water and fiber content of chips can lead us to consume multiple servings without realizing (to give you an idea, one serving of chips is only a palmful).

The Healthy Swaps:

Baked beet, sweet potato or kale chips Variety is the spice of life, so give these chip alternatives a shot. Baking can help reduce the amount of oil used, and spices can give them a flavorful kick – thyme, rosemary, garlic or just good old pepper. Popped popcorn will allow you to eat more for the same amount of calories: 2 to 3 cups of popcorn is equal to about one ounce of chips. Popcorn also comes with a lot of fiber. Rather than using Crunchy veggies Carrots, celery and water chestnuts are just a few of many veggies that deliver lots of crunch without lots of calories. Try them with your sandwich.

The Craving:

Mayonnaise. Most people like mayo for the creamy texture and its ability to carry flavors (fat carries flavor, and mayo has lots of fat!). When we make a swap, we need to maintain a creamy texture and keep the fat content relatively high, with a focus on healthy, plant-based fats.

The Healthy Swaps:

Hummus. Typically made from chickpeas, sesame seeds and olive oil, hummus has about half the calories of mayo. Plus it has some protein and fiber! Hummus usually comes in a range of flavors, so you can customize the spread to your sandwich or dish. Avocado With a slightly nutty flavor, avocado can boost the taste of any sandwich or salad, with fewer calories than mayonnaise. To take it a step further, make some guacamole with garlic, onion, tomato, lime juice and cilantro and use as a spread or as a dip for fresh veggies.

Tell Us: What are some of your favorite healthy swaps?
Through his book and blog, Death of the Diet, Jason Machowsky, MS, RD, CSCS, empowers people to live the life they want by integrating healthy eating and physical activity habits into their daily routines.

You can follow him on Twitter @JMachowskyRDFit.

Read more at: http://blog.foodnetwork.com/healthyeats/2013/07/15/one-small-change-healthy-swaps-forthree-common-cravings/?oc=linkback

3 Diet Rules to Live By

I admit struggling with what to write about for this week’s blog; with a big birthday coming up (yikes) I have suddenly become more mindful of not only what I eat, but how much I move.  I will be the first to admit this is not a glamorous topic to write about.  Sadly, I no longer have the metabolism of a teenage girl (nor the fashion choices) and I have to make extra effort every day to eat less & move more.

To assist in my pursuit for daily healthfulness, I recently purchased a Fitbit, which tracks the amount of steps I take each day.  This device has been a great reminder to move more after my daily exercise is done.  It is easy to achieve your 10,000 steps when you go out for a run, but don’t forget what you do the rest of the day matters almost as much. Research has shown that we are healthier when we move throughout the day, not just during our daily exercise routine.  Additionally, other habits such as alcohol consumption, sleep & screen time make a big difference in our quest for weight management. I am aware that extended couch spent watching DVR Downton Abbey reruns won’t do much for my derriere.  So for now I will relish the end of my 30’s, move more and only watch one Downton Abbey episode at a time.

Check out this great link from Appetite for Health 3 Diet Rules to Live By

- Limit alcohol

- Get enough sleep

- Limit screen time

Weekly Wisdom – 7 Foods That Fill You Up, Part 2

  • Chicken: baked, grilled or broiled & a great source of protein. Fish, lean meat, tofu are terrific as well.
  • Fruits & Veggies: High in fiber & water, they fill you up without blowing your calorie budget. Aim for 5-­9 servings every day. Snack on them, add to recipes or make them the start of a meal.

Source: The Real Skinny

Weekly Wisdom – Food Rules Part 6

Food Rules: Treat meat as a flavoring or special occasion food
  • Meat is a nourishing food in small amounts
  • Near vegetarians ­ “flexitarians” ­ can be just as healthy as vegetarians
  • Portion power: 4 oz meat & 8 oz veggies (average

American eats over ½ lb meat per day!)
Source: Michael Pollen Food Rules

Weekly Wisdom – 7 Foods That Fill You Up, Part 1

  •  Broth based soups: add a feeling of fullness & keep you from overindulging in the main course; try miso, vegetable soup, gazpacho.
  • Beans & legumes: tasty, versatile & nutritious; combine with low calorie vegetables.
  • Nuts: high in protein & slow to digest, but watch portions.

Source: The Real Skinny