‘MG Blog’

Minty Chocolate Beet Pudding

Serves 6

1c coconut milk, full fat

4 sprigs fresh mint

½c beet juice**

2c chocolate chips, bittersweet

2t cornstarch

3t water

1/4c sugar

1/4t salt

1t vanilla extract

 

1. Heat coconut milk, on med, to simmering

2. Remove from heat, add mint, cover & seep 30 mins

3. Combine cornstarch & water in bowl, stir to mix

4. Strain coconut milk, discard mint leaves

5. Reheat coconut milk, med heat

6. Add cornstarch mixture, stir until thickened, 2+ mins

7. Stir in beet juice, vanilla, chocolate; mix until smooth

8. Pour into 4oz ramekins

9. Serve warm or cold

**Note: beet juice at Whole Foods, or other specialty

Talk is Not Cheap

Humans are (still) social creatures wired to connect. It’s true.
And since in addition to loving food, we love people and serving others, we will always keep the conversation going about how to have a better conversation: one that leaves you and the other person feeling inspired, engaged, and basically — really good.

Watch this short TED Talk: 10 ways to have a better conversation
(It’s not just about eye contact…as she says: there’s no reason to show you are paying attention…if, in fact…you are paying attention!)

1. Don’t multi-task (physically or mentally). Be present.
2. Don’t pontificate: if you want to state opinions without discussion, write a blog! Enter every conversation assuming you have something to learn.
3. Use open-ended questions: what was that like, how did that feel, what do you think.
4. Go with the flow – meaning, let thoughts come as you are listening but let them go. Don’t check out of listening because you’re cueing up that random thought or story you want to share.
5. If you don’t know, say you don’t know.
6. Don’t equate your experience with theirs. All experiences are individual.
7. Try not to repeat yourself, it’s condescending and boring.
8. Stay out of the weeds. That detail you are trying to remember (exact year or place) really isn’t that important to others.
9. Listen. This is the most important skill humans can develop. No man ever listened himself out of a job (quoting Calvin Coolidge).
10. Be brief.
Do all of these and be prepared to be amazed.

Talk is Not Cheap

Humans are (still) social creatures wired to connect. It’s true.
And since in addition to loving food, we love people and serving others, we will always keep the conversation going about how to have a better conversation: one that leaves you and the other person feeling inspired, engaged, and basically — really good.

Watch this short TED Talk: 10 ways to have a better conversation
(It’s not just about eye contact…as she says: there’s no reason to show you are paying attention…if, in fact…you are paying attention!)

1. Don’t multi-task (physically or mentally). Be present.
2. Don’t pontificate: if you want to state opinions without discussion, write a blog! Enter every conversation assuming you have something to learn.
3. Use open-ended questions: what was that like, how did that feel, what do you think.
4. Go with the flow – meaning, let thoughts come as you are listening but let them go. Don’t check out of listening because you’re cueing up that random thought or story you want to share.
5. If you don’t know, say you don’t know.
6. Don’t equate your experience with theirs. All experiences are individual.
7. Try not to repeat yourself, it’s condescending and boring.
8. Stay out of the weeds. That detail you are trying to remember (exact year or place) really isn’t that important to others.
9. Listen. This is the most important skill humans can develop. No man ever listened himself out of a job (quoting Calvin Coolidge).
10. Be brief.
Do all of these and be prepared to be amazed.

Pumpkin Hummus

2c rinsed garbanzo beans

½c pumpkin purée

1/3c olive oil

1T chopped Italian parsley

1½t apple cider vinegar

½t+ chopped garlic

1½t maple syrup

½t cinnamon

to taste s&p

toasted pumpkin seeds (pepitas)

chopped fresh chives

 

1. Blend all (except chives) in food processor until smooth

2. Add a little hot water to thin to desired consistency

Garnish with toasted pumpkin seeds, chives & maple syrup drizzle

Pumpkin Hummus

2c rinsed garbanzo beans

½c pumpkin purée

1/3c olive oil

1T chopped Italian parsley

1½t apple cider vinegar

½t+ chopped garlic

1½t maple syrup

½t cinnamon

to taste s&p

toasted pumpkin seeds (pepitas)

chopped fresh chives

 

1. Blend all (except chives) in food processor until smooth

2. Add a little hot water to thin to desired consistency

Garnish with toasted pumpkin seeds, chives & maple syrup drizzle

Presence & Presents

Both are gifts you can get and give; but our presence is available at no charge to us and at great benefit to those around us.

Human beings cannot multitask. What we are capable of is handling a number of serial tasks in rapid succession, or mixing automatic tasks with those that are not so automatic. That’s one of the reasons the NTSB reports that texting while driving is the functional equivalent of driving with a blood alcohol level three times the legal limit. You just can’t effectively attend to two things at once – even the superficially automatic ones.

So, how do we stay present? The first thing to recognize is that, try as we might, we really can only do one thing at a time, so we ought to do that thing wholeheartedly.

Ways to foster our own “presence” include focusing on our breathing (and taking a deep breath); stepping back and observing ourselves; letting go of things that are not actually happening in the moment (meaning, the past and the future).

A busy food service operation is a great place to practice being present. Let the giving begin!

Presence & Presents

Both are gifts you can get and give; but our presence is available at no charge to us and at great benefit to those around us.

Human beings cannot multitask. What we are capable of is handling a number of serial tasks in rapid succession, or mixing automatic tasks with those that are not so automatic. That’s one of the reasons the NTSB reports that texting while driving is the functional equivalent of driving with a blood alcohol level three times the legal limit. You just can’t effectively attend to two things at once – even the superficially automatic ones.

So, how do we stay present? The first thing to recognize is that, try as we might, we really can only do one thing at a time, so we ought to do that thing wholeheartedly.

Ways to foster our own “presence” include focusing on our breathing (and taking a deep breath); stepping back and observing ourselves; letting go of things that are not actually happening in the moment (meaning, the past and the future).

A busy food service operation is a great place to practice being present. Let the giving begin!

Roasted Brussels Sprouts, Pancetta & Apples

Serves 6

1T olive oil

1lb brussels sprouts, quartered

1 firm, tart apple, diced

1 med yellow onion, diced

3oz thin pancetta, coarsely chopped

2T sherry vinegar

3 3/4c pure maple syrup

1/8t crushed red pepper flakes

½c spiced pecan pieces

 

1. Heat oven to 400°F

2. Combine brussels sprouts, apple, onion, oil, s&p; toss to coat

3. Roast 20 mins, until tender

4. Sautée pancetta in large skillet over med heat until crisp; transfer to paper towels to drain

5. Whisk together vinegar, syrup, red pepper flakes

6. Toss brussels mixture with ½ (or more) dressing & pancetta

7. Top with spiced pecan pieces

Roasted Brussels Sprouts, Pancetta & Apples

Serves 6

1T olive oil

1lb brussels sprouts, quartered

1 firm, tart apple, diced

1 med yellow onion, diced

3oz thin pancetta, coarsely chopped

2T sherry vinegar

3/4c pure maple syrup

1/8t crushed red pepper flakes

½c spiced pecan pieces

 

1. Heat oven to 400°F

2. Combine brussels sprouts, apple, onion, oil, s&p; toss to coat

3. Roast 20 mins, until tender

4. Sautée pancetta in large skillet over med heat until crisp; transfer to paper towels to drain

5. Whisk together vinegar, syrup, red pepper flakes

6. Toss brussels mixture with ½ (or more) dressing & pancetta

7. Top with spiced pecan pieces

Going up?

We recently heard Simon Sinek’s messages about empathy. He suggests that to practice empathy in the workplace we must — daily — make the well-being of others (our teammates, our customers, our health inspector, etc.) a conscious, visible, intentional priority.

This theme also connects with this article about the mood elevator.
The Mood Elevator is an awareness tool…used to describe our moment-to-moment experience of life. It encompasses a wide range of feelings and together, these emotions play a major role in defining the quality of our lives as well as our effectiveness.

Behaviors found on the “higher” (positive) floors of the mood elevator include:
 

1. Positive spirit/vitality. Creating an environment where there is teamwork, mutual support (AND EMPATHY), and cooperation…where people are fun to be around, proud of what they do, and willing to put in the effort that is beyond normal expectations.

2. Collaboration/trust. Creating frequent and open two-way communication… maintaining openness and trust…with high levels of (EMPATHY) feedback and coaching.

3. Appreciation/recognition. And rewarding performance.

4. Agility/innovation/growth. Encouraging people to innovate, create, and be open to change. Empowering people, and having a bias for action and an urgency to move forward.

5. Customer/quality focus. Having a high focus on, and awareness of, quality and customer service.

6. Ethics/integrity. Acting with honesty…Core Values and ethics are very important and decisions are made for the greater good of the organization. Seeing healthy differences and diversity as strengths.

7. Performance orientation. Having high expectations for performance and accountability for actions and results. Being a self-starter.

8. Direction/purpose. Providing a sense of direction and purpose…with clear alignment and connection with the organization’s strategic goals.

 
Live the above and you’ll be more creative, joyful and productive. Promise.

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